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Monday 21st of May 2018
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Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

Screen Shot 2014-12-27 at 08.37.11

by Cream

“Save Ferris!” went the cry. And so we did – till (almost) the end. The votes just poured in for the ultimate scamming and skiving smartarse ’80s comedy. Yeah, it’s a little childish and stupid, but then so’s high school. Actually, what makes this film work outside the US is probably the fact it’s largely set outside high school, thus avoiding many of the bewildering cliches of America’s largely alien education environment.

Ice Cold in Alex

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by Cream

John ‘Ryan’s loony’ Mills, Sylvia Sims and Harry ‘right bastard’ Andrews are gasping for a pint in this iconic wartime tale of an ambulance and team panting their way through minefields and t’ing to get to the safety of Alexandria. We’re quietly pleased that the limited supply of war films in the list are not of The Green Berets calibre or any of that shit but of rather more interest and quality than that, this being one of the best available. Carlsberg anyone?

Talk to Her

 

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by (Spain, Pedro Almodóvar) 
With his unsettling new film about how men try to express love — including ways that should give anyone the creeps — the madrileno master goes beyond his fondness for broad melodrama and bawdy camp to achieve a deadpan perversity worthy of Buñuel.

Shape Shifter

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by ThunderBolt Kevin Walsh

Premise: The teenage hero travels to Bulgaria to extricate his parents, retired secret service agents, from having been kidnapped by the bad guys.

The swirling plot of this adolescent-targeted movie held together quite well. Included in the casual action were a wise, 300+ year old wizard/mentor teaching the changeling boy “shape shifting,” dangerous plutonium in the hands of Bulgarian terrorists, a pragmatic secret service man, an underground maze, and a colony of little people. You had no trouble recognizing the film as fantasy.

The Hill

 

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by Cream

Not many films can make the viewer seethe with fury at injustice as much as this one can. The great Harry Andrews is a right bastard in charge of a WWII military prison in Africa whose prisoners include Seen ‘Sean Connery’ Canary and Roy ‘Juggernaut’ Kinnear and whose principal punishment is running up and down the titular hill in full kit in the sweltering heat. Andrews’ sergeant disgusts his fellow guard portrayed by one of the unsung greats of film acting, the late Ian Bannen. After the death and debilitation of prisoners Bannen tries to have something done but only the ineffectual camp doctor, Michael Redgrave, has a go but fails. It’s pretty gritty and there aren’t many laughs involved but, hey, that’s life.

The Serpent And The Rainbow (1988)

 

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by Octavio Ramos Jr.
Wes Craven is one of the genre’s most interesting filmmakers: at times he has created some underground gems, such as The Last House On The Left (1972), A Nightmare On Elm Street (1984), and The Hills Have Eyes (1977), but he is also responsible for trendy fare, such as the Elm Street movies, Vampire In Brooklyn (1995), and Scream (1996). The Serpent And The Rainbow falls in the former category; it is at times an engrossing film, one that carefully unravels its tale with plenty of style and more than enough shocks and chills.

Time Out

 

 

 

(5 / 5)

by (France, Laurent Cantet)

A perfectly turned tale of a dutiful bourgeois’ attempt to escape the prison house of work, told in hushed tones and made transcendent by the year’s finest performance — a subtle, wrenching turn by French stage actor Aurélien Recoing.